National Geographic Photo Camp – Chad

For the last two months, VisionWorkshops has had the unique opportunity of running another National Geographic Photo Camp series in a locale not often photographed. Through the generous support of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID’s) Peace Through Development program, 60 youth from across the country of Chad came to the capital city of N’Djamena to participate in one of three week-long camps.

During these workshops, lead by National Geographic contributing photographers Lynn Johnson, Amy Toensing, and Matt Moyer, our students explored the cultural richness of their capital city, documenting the stories and daily life of it’s diverse inhabitants.

While, for many of the students, this workshop was merely a documentation of their own backyard, nearly half of the participants traveled a great distance from the rural provinces of Batha, Guera, and Kanem to take part.

In the upcoming weeks we will see more of the amazing documentary work that resulted from these three camps, as well as explore some of the unique approaches we took in designing this particular project. Tailored to our most mature students yet, ages 16 -30, these camps also resulted in a new kind of student-teacher relationship for our staff, one that was more akin to training a colleague. On that note, I’d like to present to you the self-portraits of a few of the new young photographers working in the world.

Gislaine - National Geographic Photo Camp Chad

Djobsadi - National Geographic Photo Camp Chad

Elima - National Geographic Photo Camp Chad

Sidoine - National Geographic Photo Camp Chad

Ali - National Geographic Photo Camp Chad

Ali - National Geographic Photo Camp Chad

Achta - National Geographic Photo Camp Chad

The photography featured here was made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID.) The contents are the responsibility of the participating students and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States Government. This project was funded by USAID under the “Peace Through the Development” program.

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